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Posts tagged bulkhead

239 notes

So, it’s been awhile, but I just really noticed it…

In “Loose Cannons”, Dreadwing’s introductory episode, Bulkhead attempts at one point to throw himself over the edge of the carrier and blow himself up. But Wheeljack, Bulkhead’s brother-in-arms, stops him. In “Regeneration”, Dreadwing’s final episode, Dreadwing throws himself into a certainly fatal situation (note the repeated visuals of the characters “walking over an edge”) and the whole point is that he doesn’t have his brother there to stop him. And Dreadwing wasn’t there back in “Master and Students” to stop Skyquake either…

Filed under maccadam tfp transformers prime dreadwing wheeljack skyquake bulkhead I guess you could say... the bond between people are the real power

110 notes

"I’m not sure I wanna see Bulk right now. Not like this…"

[…]

"Doc, the commander’s ready!"

I didn’t get a chance to talk about this way back when “Minus One” first aired, but let’s just have a moment of appreciation for the difference between S2 Wheeljack’s abandonment of the comatose Bulkhead due to feeling uncomfortable at the sight of a close friend in a state of helplessness and S3 Wheeljack’s choice to assist a once hated rival regain motor functionality after a serious injury.

In fact, I don’t think I’ve talked about Wheeljack much on this blog at all and that’s a damn shame because there’s a lot of neat stuff his character goes through between the latter half of S2 and all of S3.

Filed under maccadam wheeljack tfp transformers prime beast hunters ultra magnus bulkhead minus one hurt

461 notes

lizwuzthere:

will-ruzicka:

draqua:

will-ruzicka:

smokescreensandstarscreams:

introducing Smokescreen, the cutest and bounciest little mech in all the land

bonus gif for added bounce:

There was an exchange between Wheeljack and UM and Arcee that came after this… it was a pain to figure out how to stage it properly. But… in the end, I’m glad it’s gone.

Also, I love that snap to attention! I didn’t intend it to be so cute, but it’s great how polygon animated it! XD

But now we’ll never know what Arcee/UM/WJ talked about…

image

Arcee was trying to get WJ and UM to admit they have strong feelings for each other. But it wasn’t needed, because you saw the bromance blossom during that fight when WJ hooked the whip to UM’s hammer.

Seriously though, it was an exchange that just slowed things down. They also cut out about half of the cave exploration stuff I had to board out… but trust me, the episode did not need any of it.

That bouncing gif IS super cute but uh…
What was the point of Smokey even coming along? I mean when he first did I assumed it was so that he could trail along with Magnus but then Wheeljack did that.
And honestly, that makes no sense either because in their last episode Wheeljack had just made up with Bulkhead… he’d go with his bro right? And Smokescreen being the little fanboy would probably want to go with the authority figure wouldn’t he??

And it turns out he just made it out safely with Bulkhead. So there was no purpose in the first place. (except maybe as an excuse for Bulkhead to not be in the fight but there were tons of other possibilities for that anyway that wouldn’t include that weird choice Wheeljack made following Magnus)

I sorta interpreted Smokescreen’s desire to go along not so much because he idolizes Ultra Magnus (Smokecreen’s kept UM at arm’s length so far in fact) but because he specifically wanted to spend time with Bulkhead while Bulky was working as a Wrecker. After all, Bulkhead and Smokescreen developed a nice friendship in the latter half of S2, so I see Smokescreen sticking to Bulky as a nod to that relationship. Plus. the Bulky/Smokey duo and their history of becoming pals makes for a nice parrell to what Maggy and Jackie have been going through together up to this point and within “Evolution”

(Source: mako-mako-and-me)

Filed under tfp beast hunters transformers prime evolution bulkhead smokescreen ultra magnus wheeljack

270 notes

mscottwrites:

jasonenright:

draqua:

gejumsky:

Because this scene is combat porn. Obviously, after that kick, the fight still continues, but it ends up with Dreadwing getting his aft kicked and it’s kinda painful for me, a Dreadwing fan, to see on a continuous loop.

Oh, and the last one is a bonus, presented to you by the crazier part of me. The words are inspired by Zack Fair~

(Episode source: Transformers Prime S2 “Hard Knocks”)

I’d actually like to talk about this fight scene for a minute here, because I find it not only to be a marvel of animation, blocking, and sound design… but also what it says about the characters and their arcs.

Consider this moment. Dreadwing plants a bomb on Bulkhead’s back, only for Bulkhead to pull the ol’switcheroo and stick the explosive on Dreadwing instead.

image

An admirable effort, but you’ve obviously forgotten how our last encounter ended…

image

No, I didn’t.

See, this is the key element. Bulkhead, for all his stubbornness, is still a person who can learn from his mistakes. Dreadwing one-upped him before in “Loose Cannons”, so Bulkhead took that as an educational experience, planned accordingly, and his intelligence pays off. Dreadwing, however, utilizes the same strategy, failing to compensate for his foe’s evolution, and suffers the consequences for his complacency. It’s a creative and visceral example of Dreadwing’s central character flaw: he cannot consider new ways of doing things; he cannot conceive that the world and people around him are changing, nor can he advance himself. In sticking to classic ideals without admitting the world, his cause, and the people around him have changed, he becomes his own worst enemy. It is this stagnation which ultimately proves to be his downfall several times over.

image

Dreadwing gets stuck with his own bombs, and murdered with his own gun.

image

What’s also interesting is who Bulkhead took into the field during this episode: Smokescreen. When Smokescreen was first introduced in “New Recruit”, Bulkhead feared being replaced by Smokey and continued to treat the kid coldly until the third act of “The Human Factor”, wherein Smokescreen saved Bulkhead, thus earning the Wrecker’s respect and friendship. Throughout “Hard Knocks”, Bulkhead both supports Smokescreen mentally by giving him advice on how to approach his new role amongst the Autobots, and backs Smokescreen up on the battlefield as well. Basically, Bulkhead initially disliked for Smokescreen for personal reasons, but eventually got over those feelings and forged a strong new relationship that has continued to pay off for both characters: Smokescreen saved Bulkhead and Bulkhead’s advice continues to influence Smokescreen’s maturity.

image

By contrast, Dreadwing consistently refuses Optimus Prime’s offer for friendship all throughout season 2. He continually returns to the Decepticon side, in spite of the fact that Megatron shows little to no respect for Dreadwing’s personal safety or moral values.

image

image

He sticks to his desire for revenge and faction loyalty even as evidence increasingly mounts that his efforts are wasted. In the end, Dreadwing is faced with an ultimatum: try something new, forge a new relationship, expand his skills, forgo his immediate personal issues for expansive, long-term benefits… but he just can’t do it. He cannot let go, he cannot leave his faction, no matter how hollow it has become. He cannot advance. And it costs him his life.

This all comes together in this fight scene. There’s a lot more going on here then two guys kicking each other in the guts.

So proud of my wife Mairghread Scott (mscottwrites on the tumblrs) for writing this episode. Want to know a funny insider story? We blocked out this scene in our living room. I played Dreadwing, she was Bulkhead and we figured out how the fight would go and how Bulk would end up putting the bomb on dreadwing. We basically did this whole fight scene in our tiny studio apartment. The director added a lot of cool things to the fight, but the basic choreography was all in the script in the way Mairghread blocked it out.

This is actually a really insightful view into the character arcs we were working with. And it’s true about the choreography. Thanks, fans!

(Source: dinobooty)

Filed under mscottwrites tfp transformers prime dreadwing bulkhead mairghread scott hard knocks

270 notes

jasonenright:

draqua:

gejumsky:

Because this scene is combat porn. Obviously, after that kick, the fight still continues, but it ends up with Dreadwing getting his aft kicked and it’s kinda painful for me, a Dreadwing fan, to see on a continuous loop.

Oh, and the last one is a bonus, presented to you by the crazier part of me. The words are inspired by Zack Fair~

(Episode source: Transformers Prime S2 “Hard Knocks”)

I’d actually like to talk about this fight scene for a minute here, because I find it not only to be a marvel of animation, blocking, and sound design… but also what it says about the characters and their arcs.

Consider this moment. Dreadwing plants a bomb on Bulkhead’s back, only for Bulkhead to pull the ol’switcheroo and stick the explosive on Dreadwing instead.

image

An admirable effort, but you’ve obviously forgotten how our last encounter ended…

image

No, I didn’t.

See, this is the key element. Bulkhead, for all his stubbornness, is still a person who can learn from his mistakes. Dreadwing one-upped him before in “Loose Cannons”, so Bulkhead took that as an educational experience, planned accordingly, and his intelligence pays off. Dreadwing, however, utilizes the same strategy, failing to compensate for his foe’s evolution, and suffers the consequences for his complacency. It’s a creative and visceral example of Dreadwing’s central character flaw: he cannot consider new ways of doing things; he cannot conceive that the world and people around him are changing, nor can he advance himself. In sticking to classic ideals without admitting the world, his cause, and the people around him have changed, he becomes his own worst enemy. It is this stagnation which ultimately proves to be his downfall several times over.

image

Dreadwing gets stuck with his own bombs, and murdered with his own gun.

image

What’s also interesting is who Bulkhead took into the field during this episode: Smokescreen. When Smokescreen was first introduced in “New Recruit”, Bulkhead feared being replaced by Smokey and continued to treat the kid coldly until the third act of “The Human Factor”, wherein Smokescreen saved Bulkhead, thus earning the Wrecker’s respect and friendship. Throughout “Hard Knocks”, Bulkhead both supports Smokescreen mentally by giving him advice on how to approach his new role amongst the Autobots, and backs Smokescreen up on the battlefield as well. Basically, Bulkhead initially disliked for Smokescreen for personal reasons, but eventually got over those feelings and forged a strong new relationship that has continued to pay off for both characters: Smokescreen saved Bulkhead and Bulkhead’s advice continues to influence Smokescreen’s maturity.

image

By contrast, Dreadwing consistently refuses Optimus Prime’s offer for friendship all throughout season 2. He continually returns to the Decepticon side, in spite of the fact that Megatron shows little to no respect for Dreadwing’s personal safety or moral values.

image

image

He sticks to his desire for revenge and faction loyalty even as evidence increasingly mounts that his efforts are wasted. In the end, Dreadwing is faced with an ultimatum: try something new, forge a new relationship, expand his skills, forgo his immediate personal issues for expansive, long-term benefits… but he just can’t do it. He cannot let go, he cannot leave his faction, no matter how hollow it has become. He cannot advance. And it costs him his life.

This all comes together in this fight scene. There’s a lot more going on here then two guys kicking each other in the guts.

So proud of my wife Mairghread Scott (mscottwrites on the tumblrs) for writing this episode. Want to know a funny insider story? We blocked out this scene in our living room. I played Dreadwing, she was Bulkhead and we figured out how the fight would go and how Bulk would end up putting the bomb on dreadwing. We basically did this whole fight scene in our tiny studio apartment. The director added a lot of cool things to the fight, but the basic choreography was all in the script in the way Mairghread blocked it out.

(Source: dinobooty)

Filed under tfp dreadwing bulkhead Mairghread Scott jasonenright transformers prime hard knocks

270 notes

gejumsky:

Because this scene is combat porn. Obviously, after that kick, the fight still continues, but it ends up with Dreadwing getting his aft kicked and it’s kinda painful for me, a Dreadwing fan, to see on a continuous loop.

Oh, and the last one is a bonus, presented to you by the crazier part of me. The words are inspired by Zack Fair~

(Episode source: Transformers Prime S2 “Hard Knocks”)

I’d actually like to talk about this fight scene for a minute here, because I find it not only to be a marvel of animation, blocking, and sound design… but also what it says about the characters and their arcs.

Consider this moment. Dreadwing plants a bomb on Bulkhead’s back, only for Bulkhead to pull the ol’switcheroo and stick the explosive on Dreadwing instead.

image

An admirable effort, but you’ve obviously forgotten how our last encounter ended…

image

No, I didn’t.

See, this is the key element. Bulkhead, for all his stubbornness, is still a person who can learn from his mistakes. Dreadwing one-upped him before in “Loose Cannons”, so Bulkhead took that as an educational experience, planned accordingly, and his intelligence pays off. Dreadwing, however, utilizes the same strategy, failing to compensate for his foe’s evolution, and suffers the consequences for his complacency. It’s a creative and visceral example of Dreadwing’s central character flaw: he cannot consider new ways of doing things; he cannot conceive that the world and people around him are changing, nor can he advance himself. In sticking to classic ideals without admitting the world, his cause, and the people around him have changed, he becomes his own worst enemy. It is this stagnation which ultimately proves to be his downfall several times over.

image

Dreadwing gets stuck with his own bombs, and murdered with his own gun.

image

What’s also interesting is who Bulkhead took into the field during this episode: Smokescreen. When Smokescreen was first introduced in “New Recruit”, Bulkhead feared being replaced by Smokey and continued to treat the kid coldly until the third act of “The Human Factor”, wherein Smokescreen saved Bulkhead, thus earning the Wrecker’s respect and friendship. Throughout “Hard Knocks”, Bulkhead both supports Smokescreen mentally by giving him advice on how to approach his new role amongst the Autobots, and backs Smokescreen up on the battlefield as well. Basically, Bulkhead initially disliked for Smokescreen for personal reasons, but eventually got over those feelings and forged a strong new relationship that has continued to pay off for both characters: Smokescreen saved Bulkhead and Bulkhead’s advice continues to influence Smokescreen’s maturity.

image

By contrast, Dreadwing consistently refuses Optimus Prime’s offer for friendship all throughout season 2. He continually returns to the Decepticon side, in spite of the fact that Megatron shows little to no respect for Dreadwing’s personal safety or moral values.

image

image

He sticks to his desire for revenge and faction loyalty even as evidence increasingly mounts that his efforts are wasted. In the end, Dreadwing is faced with an ultimatum: try something new, forge a new relationship, expand his skills, forgo his immediate personal issues for expansive, long-term benefits… but he just can’t do it. He cannot let go, he cannot leave his faction, no matter how hollow it has become. He cannot advance. And it costs him his life.

This all comes together in this fight scene. There’s a lot more going on here then two guys kicking each other in the guts.

(Source: dinobooty)

Filed under transformers prime tfp bulkhead dreadwing transformers hard knocks smokescreen megatron optimus prime skyquake