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Media Junk

Posts tagged fandom

4 notes

gruenkariert answered your post: Do you ever have two char…

Firefly’s Zoe and Wonder Woman sure would find things to talk about, people to rescue, stuff like that :)

Ooo, now that’s very interesting. Particularly given Diana and Zoe’s similar yet different ideals when it comes to heroism. I could see them as the type of friends who could have lots of interesting and clashing conversations, but always have each others’ backs when it’s time to rumble.

Intriguing indeed…

iam-artist answered your post: Do you ever have two char…

Aya and Data maybe?

I’ve always felt that Aya would benefit from being taught the fine art of caring for a cat…

raeseddon answered your post: Do you ever have two char…

More than I can count. The weirdt two have to be Wesley Crusher from Star Trek: TNG and Dairene Callahan from the Young Wizards series.

This is also very interesting. I’m not too familiar with the Young Wizards series, but from what I’ve read, sounds like there could be good dyanmics between the two.

Filed under gruenkariert raeseddon iam-artist crossover fandom

9 notes

Do you ever have two characters from different media properties that you think would make the most interesting friends, or at least have a cool dynamic? Like, not so much a full on crossover, just the two people and their respective satellite cast interacting. So you imagine them having adventures together, maybe fighting crime, bumping up against other characters, tackling a common enemy, talking about their personal issues, solving each others’ problems, or just mucking around?

Filed under fandom crossover follower question for me it's Dante from the original DMC series and Elizabeth from Persona 3 gotta be me... personal stuff

29 notes

That is the value of a reboot, or a new beginning. You’re allowed to welcome in new fans who are intimidated, even when offered potential starting points. And yes, maybe it’s not exactly what you wanted from it, but I learned long ago as a Batman fan that I could separate what I liked as canon and still enjoy having both versions around (to explain, my first introduction to the DC superheroes was Superfriends but MY Batman and the rest were in the DC animated universe).

And maybe the changes lead to something better. The prequels led to The Clone Wars series, which got the perfect blend between the Original’s approach to sci-fi and the new ones’ with much better characters and action that trilogy had. Transformers Animated (which I eventually gave a chance and liked, but still put me off originally) and Bay’s works kept the franchise going to Aligned, which took everything that worked from the entire franchise and is my new favorite thing of all time. The Hulk kept on going until the Avengers movie universe came into being (yes, Spider-man and Batman both helped keep superhero movies alive as well). Tron Legacy (not that bad, but still) birthed Uprising. The four Batman movies kept interest going to create the Dark Knight trilogy. Lord of the Rings is probably responsible for Game of Thrones (showed that medieval fantasy could generate a profit).

This is not an excuse for cashing in on a name, or lazily doing a reboot. It also does not mean that you cannot dislike a reboot, but this mentality that reboots automatically should not exist in favor of re-promoting the original is wrong.

If it can serve as a good or enjoyable introduction to something you wished you could share with others, why then should it be condemned? Rather than stamping your feet and yelling “You should watch this instead!” let them enjoy the reboot and when they’re hungry for more, offer up those recommendations then.

Don’t cause people to live in isolation. While it may seem like you’re only helping with giving something introduction it deserves, that mentality gets people wrapped up in a search for a sort of perfection that prevents them from ever really taking that plunge. And that’s what it is: a plunge. Sure, the diving board may be the right way to get into the pool and really take off swimming, but there’s something intimidating about that perfectly prepared entrance. It’s easier to just enter from where you’re standing at, to just drop in where you can.

Maybe it was a bad place to enter, but the pool will still be there for them to explore or perhaps try reentering later if they get out.

Reboots and the Diving Board

The Ace of Skulls

Basically my thoughts exactly on the importance of multiple installments and “jumping in” points. There’s something to be said for concerns over lack of fresh blood and original IPs in the current multi-media landscape, but that’s a discussion for another day.

(via draqua)

Wow, this has been circulating Tumblr? I just decided to check this tag to see a couple of old conversations my friends had with me, I wasn’t expecting to see this again. I’m a bit flattered.

I still stand by these words for the same example I was talking about in the full journal: I never would have touched Star Trek if not for the reboots, something I’ve seen a lot of fans decrying. These same fans kept giving me episode names to start with, and I ended up with about 20 places that were the “perfect starting point.” In the end though, I chose to jump into the pool with what I was given (well, “chose” isn’t the word, but whatever).

I still see a lot of fans of original material getting upset that newcomers aren’t jumping in where they did, but that attitude is way too isolating and puts you off from ever checking out the sources, but I already talked too much about this before.

Thanks again for finding and posting this.

(via theaceofskulls)

You’re very welcome, and thank you for writing such a nice, well flowing essay. It was tough to pick just one quote out of it that captured your thesis, since the whole piece is really spot on (hence why this quote is longer than the usual tumblr quotes), but I think it worked out in the end.

Keep on truckin’

(Source: theaceofskulls.deviantart.com, via theaceofskulls)

Filed under theaceofskulls essays fandom reboots reboots and remakes

6 notes

Anonymous asked: Draqua I come to you for some advice. For the past year I understood the massive hate the new Marvel animated shows got. I like the shows and I don't expect everyone to like them. In fact I laughed off the bigoted comments and nitpicking little things as pure ignorance. I didn't let it get to me. Until someone said "Once USM ends, suicide rate will go down 90%". That's when i lost it. Are these shows truly that bad? Will they be forgotten in time as failures? I feel ashamed of liking them

Don’t ever feel ashamed for liking what you like so long as no one is being hurt by it.

I get that the current line-up of Marvel shows aren’t for everyone, I myself have made critical posts on Ultimate Spider-man in the past. But watching and deriving personal enjoyment out a piece of entertainment media, least of all a children’s cartoon, should never be a source of shame.

Remember though, you can only control what you do and how you interpret/interact with the world. You cannot guarantee how history will vindicate certain TV shows. And in terms of the present, you cannot control how other people react to the things you like. And, yes, I feel it is good for people to have varied opinions on various topics. Divergent worldviews and perspectives are what make us human. There are will always be shows/books/movies/games that you like that the majority hates, and by contrast there will sometimes be things you dislike that the majority loves.

Still, respect other peoples’ opinions and their right to critique, discuss, or not take enjoyment out of the same things you do. A culture which is critical towards all forms of media, even children’s entertainment, is a culture which demonstrates (at least on some level) self awareness for what texts it is producing, respect for itself, and an attempt to improve future media. Admittedly, there’s a murky area sometimes between being critical of something/opening discussing it, and simply being hateful. But, again, this is another topic contemporary fandom culture and reviewers are slogging through. You are perfectly within your rights to fully enjoy something so long as you do not seek to make derogatory remarks towards those that do not share your views.

But, like I said, you can only control what you do. You cannot stop people from saying sometimes hurtful or gross things about what you like. The best advice I can give on that issue is: freely exercise your ability to block or hide posts, keep disagreements respectful and disengage (again, respectfully) if you feel that there is a chance you’ll be entering cyclical (or just plain sick) arguments.

Watching your favorite cartoons and engaging with fans/fandom is an activity that ought to make you happy. If you find yourself not enjoying performing one of these activities, then it may not be something you ought to continue in.

I hope this answer was helpful to you, and I hope you’re able to keep on enjoying your favorite shows.

Thank you very much for the ask.

Filed under ultimate spider-man anon asks marvel ultimate spiderman fandom media analysis usm

61 notes

Consider the following…

In 10 to 15 years, barring any sort of major catastrophe, all the little children who are watching Transformers Rescue Bots right now will have grown up into teenagers and young adults.

Hasbro will inevitably be planning a revitalization of the Rescue Bots brand in some way. Maybe a show done in all 3D CGI. Maybe it takes place in outer space and the ‘Bots are space station repair workers. Maybe Decepticons are incorporated into the show. Maybe the re-boot is aimed at an older demographic this time and thus contains scenes of violence and crude humor. Maybe the alt-modes of the main cast are heavily changed, and maybe several cast members are removed and/or replaced with the exception of Heatwave due to brand recognizability.

Regardless, all those Rescue Bots fans will be tapping away on their IPad 20’s, holo-keyboards, and gabbing away through future!Skype about how Hasbro has made such a horrible mockery of their beloved childhood show and how this new installment can only bring shame and ruin on what was once such a pitch perfect offering.

image

Filed under maccadam rescue bots transformers hasbro transformers rescue bots heatwave beast wars fandom

17 notes

Question:

ayellowbirds:

are there any instances of characters on TV who are shown to write fanfiction, who are NOT consistently portrayed as “weird” or “desperate”?

Well….

They don’t mention fanfiction unfortunately, but Disney’s Filmore had an interesting episode in its second season called “The Unseen Reflection” dealing with High School level YA serial fantasy book fandoms, with surprisingly accurate late 90’s, early 00’s clarity.

You can see the episode in two parts via these links

[part 1]

[part 2]

The episode starts out with the uber fans and their respective clubs being portrayed as overly obsessed and general oddballs, but as the plot plays out, a more nuanced and kinder picture emerges. Filmore and Ingrid eventually come to realize there’s nothing wrong with being passionate about something, particularly when strong friendships emerge through a shared interest. The story actually touches on some pretty interesting topics in youth fandoms like creator disillusionment, aborting fandoms, inter-fandom wars, and fan projects. In the end of the episode, it is a dismissive, condescending author, who views her fandoms as pathetic, spoiled children, who gets shamed and scorned for brushing off her loyal followers in such a way.

Again, sorry I can’t answer your question properly… But there’s always time to bring up Filmore.

Filed under filmore ayellowbirds disney the unseen reflection meta fandom

51 notes

janyu:

draqua:

Real Talk/Getting Serious Here for a Minute…
In regards to my reblogging of SirKai’s Exhaustively Comprehensive Robot Masterpost yesterday, I want to follow up with yet another strong, personal recommendation to all my followers interested in cartoons to check Beast Wars out if you haven’t already.
Now, I do not in anyway mean to make some sort of foolish True Fan claim about Transformers at large. Such reasoning is mean-spirited to it’s very core. “Fan” is a self ascribed title based on personal choice and interest. A person who consumes small or selective elements of a franchise is just as worthy a fan as someone who deliberately intakes all elements. Furthermore, someone could absorb nearly every piece of media associated with a brand and still not consider themselves a fan of it for various reasons.
I merely wish to recommend Beast Wars on general principle. Regardless of the Transformers brand which underscores it; this is a good show. It features interesting, dynamic characters who forge equally investing relationships with one another. Writing is sharp and tackles creative sci-fi concepts in fresh, mature ways while still staying accessible to all ages. The humor is top form while still being able to get believable heavy and serious when the situation calls for it. It’s a show that can run the full spectrum of emotions without feeling overblown.
Yes, it is a product of the 90’s and features dated animation. Yes, it features some unusual concepts. It has it’s flaws like any show. However, I still highly recommend you at least give it a shot. I say this not as a Transformers lover, but as a general fan of quality children’s entertainment. If you’re in the United States, the show can be viewed in its entirety on Netflix. It is also available on DVD from ShoutFactory.
Thank you for your time.

I agree with your recommendation and your reasons for it, but I really want to thank you for your definition of “fan.”  The “you’re not a real fan unless you’ve consumed every iteration of the franchise in full, including the ones you don’t enjoy” stuff bugs me both when I love most of a franchise and when I only follow a part of it.

Thank you very much, and you’re welcome.
I feel that it’s an important distinction to be made. And of course, this applies to all media franchises, not just Transformers.

janyu:

draqua:

Real Talk/Getting Serious Here for a Minute…

In regards to my reblogging of SirKai’s Exhaustively Comprehensive Robot Masterpost yesterday, I want to follow up with yet another strong, personal recommendation to all my followers interested in cartoons to check Beast Wars out if you haven’t already.

Now, I do not in anyway mean to make some sort of foolish True Fan claim about Transformers at large. Such reasoning is mean-spirited to it’s very core. “Fan” is a self ascribed title based on personal choice and interest. A person who consumes small or selective elements of a franchise is just as worthy a fan as someone who deliberately intakes all elements. Furthermore, someone could absorb nearly every piece of media associated with a brand and still not consider themselves a fan of it for various reasons.

I merely wish to recommend Beast Wars on general principle. Regardless of the Transformers brand which underscores it; this is a good show. It features interesting, dynamic characters who forge equally investing relationships with one another. Writing is sharp and tackles creative sci-fi concepts in fresh, mature ways while still staying accessible to all ages. The humor is top form while still being able to get believable heavy and serious when the situation calls for it. It’s a show that can run the full spectrum of emotions without feeling overblown.

Yes, it is a product of the 90’s and features dated animation. Yes, it features some unusual concepts. It has it’s flaws like any show. However, I still highly recommend you at least give it a shot. I say this not as a Transformers lover, but as a general fan of quality children’s entertainment. If you’re in the United States, the show can be viewed in its entirety on Netflix. It is also available on DVD from ShoutFactory.

Thank you for your time.

I agree with your recommendation and your reasons for it, but I really want to thank you for your definition of “fan.”  The “you’re not a real fan unless you’ve consumed every iteration of the franchise in full, including the ones you don’t enjoy” stuff bugs me both when I love most of a franchise and when I only follow a part of it.

Thank you very much, and you’re welcome.

I feel that it’s an important distinction to be made. And of course, this applies to all media franchises, not just Transformers.

Filed under beast wars fandom transformers janyu tfp hasbro fan

20 notes

Sometimes I wonder.

luminak:

Sometimes I wonder what it would have been like if we had Tumblr while Beast Wars or Reboot aired. Like what would the amount of fanfiction and fan art be like? How much more variety we would have had?

It’s frustrating going through the tags of these great old shows and not seeing as much fan art/fiction that they deserve. 

Just a thought.

I often wonder the same thing myself. It’s also a good testament to just how important the internet, digital media tools, and social networking websites have been in the organization of fandom.

Fandom has always existed, fan creations have always existed, and technology doesn’t wholly determine a subculture’s development; but it’s still a very important factor.

(via luminak-deactivated20130217)

Filed under beast wars reboot mainframe nostalgic cartoons transformers luminak fanfiction fanart fandom

252,643 notes

Name a fandom you know I know and I’ll tell you

1. The first character I first fell in love with
2. The character I never expected to love as much as I do now
3. The character everyone else loves that I don’t
4. The character I love that everyone else hates
5. The character I used to love but don’t any longer
6. The character I would totally smooch
7. The character I’d want to be like
8. The character I’d slap
9. A pairing that I love
10. A pairing that I despise

(via babblingbug)

Filed under meme draqua fandom