Draqua's pad

Media Junk

Posts tagged media analysis

1 note

Anonymous asked: What do you think of transmedia; and stories told through it?

I really like transmedia/multiplatform storytelling (in fact, a lot of my favorite franchises are employing the technique) so long as:

  1. Each component is well put together and tells a complete story in its own right with solid, interesting characters in the central cast while still building towards something larger*
  2. Each component is decently accessible to new audience members. IE: there’s enough contextual information within the work to catch people up quickly, and get them invested without being too impenetrable or confusing
  3. Each component is decently accessible in a more practical purchasing and viewing sense. As in, I can go to Amazon and order the relevant books/games/comics/whatever to a given story fairly easily and not have to worry about something being out of print or caught up in legal/distribution issues

*Whether or not a piece succeeds or fails in this, and what qualifies as a solid story with solid characters for that matter can be pretty subjective though

Filed under anon asks media analysis multiplatform storytelling Anonymous

25 notes

Alright, big announcement time!

My time spent on tumblr and youtube these past 3 years observing the pop culture editorial scene has made me realize that I’ve got a serious passion for talking about kid’s cartoons. So, I’ve launched a new webseries called Double Layer aimed at offering reviews and editorial on children’s media and other entertainment related topics. Obviously, this project is just getting off the ground, so there’s likely going to be a steep learning curve and a lot of changes occurring video-to-video as I find a working flow. But, you’ll never learn until you start putting stuff out there.

For the first official episode of Double Layer, we examine the upcoming Transformers Age of Extinction and the Protagonist based on an expanded version of this post here.

Filed under transformers double layer media analysis transformers age of extinction

9 notes

andrewrrobinson asked: I just wanted to express my appreciation that there are people like you watching Kaijudo and not only can speak to it but have watched it critically and are able to articulate really intelligent opinions.

Oh my! Well, thank you very much. That makes me really happy to hear. Kaijudo has great content to offer viewers and I’ve been having a lot of fun watching/discussing it. And I’m extra glad that people enjoying what I post.

Once again, big shout-out to everyone who recommended I give it a watch!

Filed under faerborne kaijudo kaijudo rise of the duel masters media analysis

3 notes

Anonymous asked: Hello I am the woman who ask for the mystery incorporated character analysis. You don't have to do all the characters, at last the five main characters. I am sorry for bothering you, but there is truly so much negativity to the characters, especially from deviantart and livejourncil, reading your pad brights my days. Even when you don't like a series you are rarely if ever hateful unlike many people on the net. Thank you for reading this Draqua, bless your joyful pad always.

Certainly, I was planning on focusing on the 5 main characters anyways, but I might throw in a little bit on the original Mystery Inc. (Cassidy William’s group) just to help show all the sides and note how the characters discuss the overall series theme.

I admittedly started watching Mystery Inc. once it was well into S2, and I mostly relied off tumblr or independent bloggers to give me information about the series. As such, I missed a lot of the negative reception I’ve since heard about that the initially show received. Perhaps if I’d watched from episode 1, I might be singing a different tune, but I like to at least think not.

That being said, I think it’s good to be critical. A mass audience should not imply a monolithic, positive response: particularly towards entertainment media (and especially children’s cartoons). Look closely at the bread and circuses you’re thrown. Challenge, and demand to be challenged! But in terms of budgeting my personal time and having an enjoyable time on tumblr, I’d much rather focus on what I like or find interesting about shows/movies/cartoons/comic rather than what I don’t. There have shows I’ve disliked or found serious flaws with in the past which I’ve discussed here, but if I honestly don’t find value in something to watch for recreation, I don’t really have the time or energy to blog about it. That’s my just me though.

I’m really happy you’ve enjoyed reading my blog, and I’m glad I was able to put something fun out into the world.

Filed under anon asks scooby doo mystery inc media analysis Anonymous

6 notes

Anonymous asked: Draqua I come to you for some advice. For the past year I understood the massive hate the new Marvel animated shows got. I like the shows and I don't expect everyone to like them. In fact I laughed off the bigoted comments and nitpicking little things as pure ignorance. I didn't let it get to me. Until someone said "Once USM ends, suicide rate will go down 90%". That's when i lost it. Are these shows truly that bad? Will they be forgotten in time as failures? I feel ashamed of liking them

Don’t ever feel ashamed for liking what you like so long as no one is being hurt by it.

I get that the current line-up of Marvel shows aren’t for everyone, I myself have made critical posts on Ultimate Spider-man in the past. But watching and deriving personal enjoyment out a piece of entertainment media, least of all a children’s cartoon, should never be a source of shame.

Remember though, you can only control what you do and how you interpret/interact with the world. You cannot guarantee how history will vindicate certain TV shows. And in terms of the present, you cannot control how other people react to the things you like. And, yes, I feel it is good for people to have varied opinions on various topics. Divergent worldviews and perspectives are what make us human. There are will always be shows/books/movies/games that you like that the majority hates, and by contrast there will sometimes be things you dislike that the majority loves.

Still, respect other peoples’ opinions and their right to critique, discuss, or not take enjoyment out of the same things you do. A culture which is critical towards all forms of media, even children’s entertainment, is a culture which demonstrates (at least on some level) self awareness for what texts it is producing, respect for itself, and an attempt to improve future media. Admittedly, there’s a murky area sometimes between being critical of something/opening discussing it, and simply being hateful. But, again, this is another topic contemporary fandom culture and reviewers are slogging through. You are perfectly within your rights to fully enjoy something so long as you do not seek to make derogatory remarks towards those that do not share your views.

But, like I said, you can only control what you do. You cannot stop people from saying sometimes hurtful or gross things about what you like. The best advice I can give on that issue is: freely exercise your ability to block or hide posts, keep disagreements respectful and disengage (again, respectfully) if you feel that there is a chance you’ll be entering cyclical (or just plain sick) arguments.

Watching your favorite cartoons and engaging with fans/fandom is an activity that ought to make you happy. If you find yourself not enjoying performing one of these activities, then it may not be something you ought to continue in.

I hope this answer was helpful to you, and I hope you’re able to keep on enjoying your favorite shows.

Thank you very much for the ask.

Filed under ultimate spider-man anon asks marvel ultimate spiderman fandom media analysis usm

3 notes

nattygism asked: shyly came for the Transformers stuff, stayed because I enjoy the analysis of other shows!

At the beginning and end of the day… my heart shall always beat for robots. And I’m really glad you find the other stuff interesting too. Let me know if there’s any topic/show in particular you’d like to discuss at some point in the future. I’m always happy to oblige if I have the knowledge base.

image

Rrrrrrrrreeerrrrrbooooooottttssss

Filed under nattygism transformers draqua rescue bots media analysis

6 notes

I often use this blog to discuss contemporary pieces of media, like cartoons or movies, that I’m interested in or I feel have analyzable elements. But, since it’s the Holiday season, let’s crank back the clock and examine an often overlooked nostalgic movie with some interesting points.

Here we have the infamous “action figure” scene from Snow Day, a family film from Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon Movies released in the year 2000. It was originally pitched as a theatrical version of Nick’s own TV show, The Adventures of Pete & Pete, but these plans were scrapped and Snow Day was re-written as a standalone feature.

The plot follows a typical nuclear American family and the various adventures they have during the titular snow day. The A plot is a rather predictable romp following the older brother character as he attempts to woo the girl of his dreams through various unsuccessful and comical methods; only to discover that his childhood best friend has harbored feelings for him this whole time. Snore.

The really entertaining bits come from the middle child character, Natalie Brandston, who crusades with her band of friends against the insane Snow Plow Man and his attempts to clean the streets. She carries around her a Meltar action figure as a sort of good luck charm/inspiration symbol.  In the above scene, she’s hit her Hero’s Lowest Point and is ready to give up the fight. But, either by magic or the power of her own imagination, the whole team of figures come alive and implore her to rally her courage, gather allies, and continue on her quest to stop The Snow Plow Man. She takes this spurning to heart and amasses an army of nearly all the kids in town, leading an assault against her enemy, see that clip here

Note also the titles of the books behind Meltar as he cheers her on. That’s good thematic imagery.

image

I find this whole concept pretty interesting from a children’s media perspective. The figures have no real world equivalent, but are clearly meant to be analogues for popular 80’s multimedia franchises like He-Man or Thundercats. 

So, you have a young female character happily taking up playthings falling outside her gender association, unironically enjoying, and drawing strength from them.  She is also well educated in the narrative lore of the figures, since she demonstrates knowledge of their back-story, personalities, and motivations. It’s noted that they originally belonged to Hal, the older brother, and that he plans to keep them mint and sell them for profit.  Natalie, by contrast, wants to play with them, make up stories with them, and draw inspiration from them as iconic heroes.  She wants to use them the way toys were meant to be used.  Furthermore, since they bolster her bravery and leadership skills, she uses them to remind her to be a stronger person, rather than seeing them as an item to sell and get rich from.  Throughout the film, Natalie proves herself to be a capable leader, a loyal friend, and a woman of action and agency.

Snow Day is certainly not a well shot, nor a well acted movie, but it has some interesting uses of action figures and female characters if nothing else. 

Filed under snow day nostalgic movies media analysis nickelodeon the adventures of pete and pete pete and pete meltar hero's journey action figures he man thundercats

4 notes

raeseddon:

draqua:

raeseddon started following you

Turtle power, dude!

I couldn’t not after such thoughtful and in depth analysis! I think one of the things we’re going to see, as far as the animation industry goes in the next few years is that serialized animation—not theatrical, theatrical has found it’s place as “high art”— but serialized animation is going to be taken just as seriously as it’s live action counter parts.

Granted, there are a few very large, ideological blocks standing in the way of that, such as franchising, but I think when a serial animation can survive on ratings and dvd sales alone, without the toy marketing that often comes with it, the concept of the genre will undergo a massive shift in popular culture.

Thank you very much, I’m glad you found it interesting.

Yes, as I mentioned in my “franchise children’s media” post, I do feel that televised animation is an industry that stands a strong chance of getting bigger, having more money invested in it, and be expected to provide larger returns.  We see this already in terms of how many fairly high quality cartoons are on air right now, the type of budget they necessitated, and the type of people associated with their production. There have always been good cartoons, there have always been expensive cartoons…  but never in quite this amount, and not all at once.

But, as you say, there’s a lot of transition leg work that needs to be done.  Where will the money come from?  Will tie-in product lines continue or will it be through selling ad space, online distribution, and dvd/blu-ray sales? 

Another big obstacle I see right now is the conflict between television networks and content producers.  The Motorcity vs. Disney XD is a popular example, but we also see Cartoon Network’s attitude towards DC related animation.  If the creators of children’s entertainment cannot count on a healthy, supporting relationship from the hosting network, then the longevity, profitability, and safety of the program suffers.

Speaking of Cartoon Network, Hasbro faced similar problems with Transformers Animated having little to no promotion, a poor airing schedule, and heaps upon heaps of behind-the-scenes arguments about who owned what and who would profit most at the end of the day.  Hasbro’s response was eventually to say: “Fine!  I’ll make my own network, with ponies and blackjack!” and partnered with Discovery to make The HUB.  Transformers Animated got the axe, but Hasbro got to make a channel with an unprecedented level of control over their programs, reap more benefits, and also decided to make the jump from a toy and games company into a full on multi-media corporation.

Poor Warner Brothers used to have their own network to air cartoons on…  but not anymore.

Now, heck, I’m no expert on market research, the economy, or anything.  But I do see a lot of potential for things to change.  Like the introduction of digital media sales for music, movies, and e-books over these last few years; there’s going to be a lot of growing pains.  Networks and producers need to re-structure their relationship, or come to profitable compromises if the industry is going to expand.  It’ll be a process, and some good shows are probably going to die before their time through no fault of their own.  Such is reality. Meanwhile, we as viewers just have to hang in there, support the shows we like as best we can, and see how it all plays out.

Filed under cartoon network kids wb media analysis raesddon tfa tfp to sell itunes to sell stuff to sell toys warner brothers i don't care much for tfa but i'm still sad it got shot in the foot and i feel bad for its fans too of course

52 notes

*made re-bloggable by request*

This is a very interesting question.

Indeed, you’re right.  We live in a media landscape where nearly all of the big name children’s cartoons, movies, video-games, and some TV shows are based off of pre-existing franchises/remakes.  As usual, it has a lot to do with money and the logic that audiences will keep coming back to a brand which has entertained them well in the past…  but there’s something a little more complex going on here I think.

Because, we also live in a world where there are a huge amount of screens (TV, laptop, tablet, cellphone, video games on your TV, handheld games, movie theaters, internet) competing for our attention.  It’s very easy for audiences to find a large amount of entertainment, what’s not so easy is for media-makers to find a large audience. 

To illustrate what I mean, consider these two examples: Chris Anderson’s theory of The Long Tail, and Red Letter Media's Blurring Effect of Popular Culture as discussed in Mr. Plinkett’s review of the 2009 Star Trek film (skip to 6:46 of part 1).  While one is academic and the other is satirical; both hit very similar central themes when it comes to audiences and the media products they partake in.

The Long Tail holds that culture and the economy is shifting away from focusing on a small number of “hits” (mainstream products and markets that everyone buys into), and towards a huge number of niche titles that only a few people are interested in.  Niche titles tend to be cheaper and faster to produce, but are also ultra specific.  Furthermore, in a world where products, media, and services are increasingly accessed through non-physical means, niche products can be made easily accessible to customers via the internet.  Producers can no longer bank on people being interested in buying/watching one product, because they can turn to other, highly personalized forms of entertainment through other mediums.

The Red Letter Media crew poses a similar paradox; there’s an abundance of TV channels, movies, TV shows, popular websites, etc. available right now.  People don’t have to all watch the same things anymore, and people are more likely to gravitate to what interests them and only that.  So, in order to guarantee a strong viewership, media makers focus on recognizable names, brands, and franchises from pre-mass internet culture; because the farther back you go, the less competition there is, and the sharper the image will be.

This is a particularly big deal for children’s entertainment media, because its a genre so heavily based in easily recognizable images, concepts, and characters.  This has a lot to do with tie-in products.  Remember, most televised animation (particularly the heavy hitters like Transformers and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles) make their money almost exclusively through merchandise: toys, stuffies, books, clothes, theme parks, fruit pies, underwear, etc.

Audience interest, and finance, is easily distracted and attention/money moves quickly to and from things.  I think cartoons, much like video-games, are becoming somewhat like the movie industry.  They get media exposure, conduct events, generate buzz, and generally do everything humanly possible with all the multi-media tools at their disposal to ensure people are watching their show.   This is particularly notable in the case of shows like Transformers Prime and My Little Pony who get a ton of promotional attention on the HUB network, since they’re the big rating draw, and also represent two of Hasbro’s most visible brands right now.

This gets back to your original point that so many popular kid’s TV shows these days are franchise related: its because they represent a safer bet for media companies to sink their dollars into.  The name offers a measure of security that people will engage with that specific show as opposed to doing something else.  Big, franchise names attract the most money, big names, and big talent.  Meanwhile, original content shows don’t always get the best treatment.

Now, like you said, just because something is a remake or part of a franchise (not original content): doesn’t automatically make it bad.  And by extension, just because something is original, doesn’t make it automatically good.  It’s okay not to get into Motorcity, heck, I have some problems with it too; although I love it for its animation, designs, and the female characters.  Now, it can be debated if Disney’s to blame when it comes to Motorcity’s narrative problems, and we’re still not sure just how much creative control The Mouse House had over what actually got in the show (or what they took out). 

I do think there’s a concern to be raised that the big name franchise titles, like TFP or Ultimate Spider-man, might draw money/talent/resources away from original titles

Would Motorcity be better if it had Charlie Bean (director of Tron: Uprising) on board?  If Marty Isenberg (story editor of Transformers Animated and GI Joe Renegades) headed up the writing staff of Motorcity, would plot and character development flow better?  If it commanded the kind of external media attention Transformers Prime does, would Disney treat its scheduling better? 

The 2012 TMNT was given the green light for a second, 26 episode season after only the first 2 episodes had premiered whereas Motorcity’s was not renewed.  If Motorcity was…  say…  a cartoon tie-in for Hot Wheels or something…  would fate have been kinder?  Would the production staff have been allowed more creative freedom?

I think its important to know that franchise association does not automatically imply safety…  Tron Uprising's in danger too, and GI Joe Renegades was canceled to make room in public consciousness for the second live-action GI Joe movie.  Entertainment is a fickle mistress.

Anyways, this has probably gone on for too long.  But to cap it all off:

  • Franchises are both a cause and a result of the current economic, entertainment media, and culture environment we find ourselves in 
  • A good show, regardless of origins, will always be a good show.  Don’t feel ashamed for loving a merchandise-driven money sink.  Don’t feel disappointed in yourself for not liking something with original content 
  • Life isn’t fair: good show’s get cancelled through no fault of their own. Franchise or not
  • It’s all about the money money money
  • My inbox is always open for further inquiries

Thank you for reading

Filed under motorcity tfp tmnt red letter media media analysis children's cartoons spider-man tron tron uprising mr. plinkett transformers to sell toys

5 notes

Anonymous asked: In this period of animation, or just the entertainment industry in general, so many cartoons nowadays are based off of old franchises. That's not to say those certain revamps have been bad; most are actually pretty good. I bring this up because a friend lamented that cartoons these days are too dependent on franchises; nothing is original anymore. Any original I do find, its usually low quality to me (can't get into Motorcity at all). Your thoughts?

This is a very interesting question.

Indeed, you’re right.  We live in a media landscape where nearly all of the big name children’s cartoons, movies, video-games, and some TV shows are based off of pre-existing franchises/remakes.  As usual, it has a lot to do with money and the logic that audiences will keep coming back to a brand which has entertained them well in the past…  but there’s something a little more complex going on here I think.

Because, we also live in a world where there are a huge amount of screens (TV, laptop, tablet, cellphone, video games on your TV, handheld games, movie theaters, internet) competing for our attention.  It’s very easy for audiences to find a large amount of entertainment, what’s not so easy is for media-makers to find a large audience. 

To illustrate what I mean, consider these two examples: Chris Anderson’s theory of The Long Tail, and Red Letter Media's Blurring Effect of Popular Culture as discussed in Mr. Plinkett’s review of the 2009 Star Trek film (skip to 6:46 of part 1).  While one is academic and the other is satirical; both hit very similar central themes when it comes to audiences and the media products they partake in.

The Long Tail holds that culture and the economy is shifting away from focusing on a small number of “hits” (mainstream products and markets that everyone buys into), and towards a huge number of niche titles that only a few people are interested in.  Niche titles tend to be cheaper and faster to produce, but are also ultra specific.  Furthermore, in a world where products, media, and services are increasingly accessed through non-physical means, niche products can be made easily accessible to customers via the internet.  Producers can no longer bank on people being interested in buying/watching one product, because they can turn to other, highly personalized forms of entertainment through other mediums.

The Red Letter Media crew poses a similar paradox; there’s an abundance of TV channels, movies, TV shows, popular websites, etc. available right now.  People don’t have to all watch the same things anymore, and people are more likely to gravitate to what interests them and only that.  So, in order to guarantee a strong viewership, media makers focus on recognizable names, brands, and franchises from pre-mass internet culture; because the farther back you go, the less competition there is, and the sharper the image will be.

This is a particularly big deal for children’s entertainment media, because its a genre so heavily based in easily recognizable images, concepts, and characters.  This has a lot to do with tie-in products.  Remember, most televised animation (particularly the heavy hitters like Transformers and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles) make their money almost exclusively through merchandise: toys, stuffies, books, clothes, theme parks, fruit pies, underwear, etc.

Audience interest, and finance, is easily distracted and attention/money moves quickly to and from things.  I think cartoons, much like video-games, are becoming somewhat like the movie industry.  They get media exposure, conduct events, generate buzz, and generally do everything humanly possible with all the multi-media tools at their disposal to ensure people are watching their show.   This is particularly notable in the case of shows like Transformers Prime and My Little Pony who get a ton of promotional attention on the HUB network, since they’re the big rating draw, and also represent two of Hasbro’s most visible brands right now.

This gets back to your original point that so many popular kid’s TV shows these days are franchise related: its because they represent a safer bet for media companies to sink their dollars into.  The name offers a measure of security that people will engage with that specific show as opposed to doing something else.  Big, franchise names attract the most money, big names, and big talent.  Meanwhile, original content shows don’t always get the best treatment.

Now, like you said, just because something is a remake or part of a franchise (not original content): doesn’t automatically make it bad.  And by extension, just because something is original, doesn’t make it automatically good.  It’s okay not to get into Motorcity, heck, I have some problems with it too; although I love it for its animation, designs, and the female characters.  Now, it can be debated if Disney’s to blame when it comes to Motorcity’s narrative problems, and we’re still not sure just how much creative control The Mouse House had over what actually got in the show (or what they took out). 

I do think there’s a concern to be raised that the big name franchise titles, like TFP or Ultimate Spider-man, might draw money/talent/resources away from original titles

Would Motorcity be better if it had Charlie Bean (director of Tron: Uprising) on board?  If Marty Isenberg (story editor of Transformers Animated and GI Joe Renegades) headed up the writing staff of Motorcity, would plot and character development flow better?  If it commanded the kind of external media attention Transformers Prime does, would Disney treat its scheduling better? 

The 2012 TMNT was given the green light for a second, 26 episode season after only the first 2 episodes had premiered whereas Motorcity’s was not renewed.  If Motorcity was…  say…  a cartoon tie-in for Hot Wheels or something…  would fate have been kinder?  Would the production staff have been allowed more creative freedom?

I think its important to know that franchise association does not automatically imply safety…  Tron Uprising's in danger too, and GI Joe Renegades was canceled to make room in public consciousness for the second live-action GI Joe movie.  Entertainment is a fickle mistress.

Anyways, this has probably gone on for too long.  But to cap it all off:

  • Franchises are both a cause and a result of the current economic, entertainment media, and culture environment we find ourselves in 
  • A good show, regardless of origins, will always be a good show.  Don’t feel ashamed for loving a merchandise-driven money sink.  Don’t feel disappointed in yourself for not liking something with original content 
  • Life isn’t fair: good show’s get cancelled through no fault of their own. Franchise or not
  • It’s all about the money money money
  • My inbox is always open for further inquiries

Thank you for reading

Filed under motorcity red letter media tfp tmnt media analysis the long tail mr. plinkett pop culture spider-man franchise remakes mlp buy the toys disney

282 notes

I’m gonna be a great warrior someday…  Like Optimus!

What I liked about Hard Knocks was that it really hammered home a theme that I feel has been underlying Transformers Prime throughout it’s run.  That being a hero, or living legend, is actually an extremely raw deal. 

I’ve discussed before that TFP!Optimus as a character is basically a critique on epic heroes and war idols.  He’s big, strong, and rarely in the wrong.  The perfect solider, father, leader, and an all around gentleman.  However, it’s also very clear that behind those gleaming windows and deep baritone, Optimus is crying on the inside.  He lives, works, and speaks all for the sake of others and must forgo personal expression/wants for his cause. His value as a person rests not on who he is, but rather what he is.

This is contrasted in the latter half of S2 with the idealistic, fresh-faced Smokescreen.  Introduced as a young solider desperate to prove his strength and become a legendary warrior just like Optimus Prime.  Indeed, Smokescreen comes off an intentionally cliche archetypical character, flat out stating his desires for heroic status, claiming it’s “his destiny”.  

Of course, we know that destiny is an unkind force in the TFP world.  And we also know that Smokescreen is barking up a very unhappy tree when it comes to his life goals.

Do you really want to be “like Optimus”?  Do you really want social isolation from your friends, family, and loved ones?  Do you really want to repress your personal desires that much?  You want Optimus’ life of pain and sacrifice?

Smokescreen is ultimately revealed to be the final Omega Key, proving that he’s more like Optimus than thought previously.  His value now being on what he is rather than who.  Let us also not forget that in the Orion Pax 3 parter which opened S2, Optimus was also called upon to sacrifice his youthful self for the sake of the Autobot cause.

And they used a key to do that too…

And that’s really the great tragedy of this whole event.  Optimus shoulders the burden of living as a Prime so that no one else has to.  Yet in the end, he cannot protect Smokescreen from being placed in a similar position.  Being a hero is a path of horror, and having your inner being torn out for the sake of others…  Much like what Knockout plans to do with Smokescreen.

You wanna be something, kid?  Well, wish granted…

Filed under tfp transformers prime hard knocks smokescreen optimus prime optimus transformers media analysis tf arcee orion pax orion

5 notes

Cartoon Discussion: Young Justice Season 1 Thoughts

Last week, I finished watching Young Justice's first season.  Overall, it was a very good show, but has some notable issues that kept from reaching true greatness.  I thought I'd do a point form list on some of this season.  Keep in mind this is not a formal review, just my scattered, general opinions.

Read more …

Filed under young justice yj dc cartoon discussion miss martian superboy super boy artemis kid flash robin joker batman action show media analysis red arrow