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Double Layer Editorial: Analysing Osmosis Jones

obfuscobble:

draqua:

obfuscobble:

THIS IS NOT A TEST!!!!!

THE OSMOSIS JONES REVIEW IS OUT!!!

It was everything I thought it would be and so much more.

To anyone who’s been ignoring it all week, you best watch it now.  And why?  because This time, Draqua covers both race relations and how one analyses them in film even when the allegory has not been made overt.  As well, I think that this review more than the former lets the audience understand full-on why media aimed at children is so very important.  And one day, Draqua, one day people in power might start listening.  I like your imagined modern ending to the movie a lot better.  She deserved that.

I never even thought about Thrax’ character motivation tying into trying to impress and gain recognition by the very establishment that sought to destroy him.  That’s- I actually paused the video and had a think.  Stunning.

The “tiny” size of the movie clips is no longer bothersome to me.  I realise now, in hindsight, that the reason it seemed too tiny for the Transformers review was that, well, TF can visually be an overcomplicated mess at any size.  The art direction on Osmosis Jones allowed for the image to shine through at any size.

Also, I’d like to personally bring up the use of CGI for Drix, furthering his othering in the story, but also his immediate artificial value.

I’m really glad you enjoyed it and that it provided food for thought, that’s exactly what I was hoping for. Aw yeah!

Also to your last point about Drix’s animation, you’re exactly right. On the commentary track for the DVD, Sito and Kroon note that each “species” has a particular design/animation language to further communicate what they are and how they relate to Frank. The cells have soft, squishy bodies with translucent exteriors because they are a part of Frank, they move along with him. The viruses have hard, solid, lizard-like forms further emphasizing how they don’t “fit” into the system (which is another little detail to layer into Thrax’s motivation). Similarly, Drix is an artificially created and foreign entity, so his body is solid, robotic looking, and animated using CGI. It’s a good example of using medium specific visuals to carry forward characterisation and themes I think.

Ah, I had notice the soft edges to the cells, but not compared that to Thrax’ hard edges, even though something abut it had been banging about my brain!  Thank you so much for this behind the scenes insight.  See, people, this is the sort of built in design commentary that “you don’t notice… but your brain did” that it is so easy and fitting to do in Animation!  Animation can be a thing that frees artists and allows deeper commentary on a work’s themes and setting thanks to its artistic choices!  I love seeing animation used like this!

Though really, Osmosis Jones is one of the forgotten animated films.  Unlike the charming cult love for Cats Don’t Dance as an anti-segregation musical, and the almost universally accepted importance, impact, and visual beauty of cold war scoffing The Iron Giant (at least in art schools), before you, Draqua, I had heard no one singing the praises of Osmosis Jones, even though I’d enjoyed the film (even saw it in theatres back in the day because blood cells versus disease how cool is that as a concept).  Personally, I think that this comes back to the film’s use of live action.  It’s not quite a live action film, and the inclusion of animation makes a lot of (misguided) adults think “oh so it’s just a children’s cartoon pleh”.  And it’s not completely animated, and yet also not using the same animation-on-live action schema as Who Framed Rodger Rabbit? and Cool World, so some animation purists can unintentionally skip over it.  I think this does a disservice to the film, to leave it forgotten.  Then again, it would have been really interesting to see the pg-13 version.  I would hope it wouldn’t amp up the live action gross-out humour, but rather amp up the ravages of Thrax.  We’ll never know!

Follow up thought :  I wonder why Osmosis Jones, Cats Don’t Dance, and The Iron Giant failed in the box office.  Does it have to do with competition with Disney?  Is it because they came out at the wrong time? 97-2001 was at the tail end of the Disney Renaissance and the ensuing dead zone before the great CGI boom.  In this same time period, The Emperor’s New Groove, Titan AE, and Atlantis came out and flopped hard.  Was this simply a dark period for any film that dared to go against the disney Princess convention, appeal to boys, or an older audience?  It seems that’s something most of these films (other than Cats DD) have in common : the same creative risk to free animation onto rougher and bolder stories outside of the current conventions.  Risks that didn’t pay off.  (Not to say that Mulan isn’t rough and bold.  love that film, may it reign)  Lilo and Stitch did relatively well, but wasn’t quite the box office success hoped for, and it again delved into deep waters.  I wonder : was this just an effect of a bad time for animation, or yet another permutation of the American resistance to animation as a legitimate art form capable of telling adult stories?

Yeah, all three films had terrible marketing exposure and bad release dates. From most of the data I can dig up though, Osmosis Jones has sold the best on home media… which might be why it received a brief TV series which I’ve been surprised to see has a small fandom of its own.

The DVD release of Osmosis Jones also has some of the original “PG-13” scenes as bonus features, though nothing substantially violent. Still, it’s cool to see.

Filed under osmosis jones obfuscobble double layer I'm not really big on the Osmosis Jones TV series because it lacks a lot of the substance that made the move great and it chucks Leah out of the story but it has some neat ideas

22 notes

Double Layer Editorial: Analysing Osmosis Jones

obfuscobble:

THIS IS NOT A TEST!!!!!

THE OSMOSIS JONES REVIEW IS OUT!!!

It was everything I thought it would be and so much more.

To anyone who’s been ignoring it all week, you best watch it now.  And why?  because This time, Draqua covers both race relations and how one analyses them in film even when the allegory has not been made overt.  As well, I think that this review more than the former lets the audience understand full-on why media aimed at children is so very important.  And one day, Draqua, one day people in power might start listening.  I like your imagined modern ending to the movie a lot better.  She deserved that.

I never even thought about Thrax’ character motivation tying into trying to impress and gain recognition by the very establishment that sought to destroy him.  That’s- I actually paused the video and had a think.  Stunning.

The “tiny” size of the movie clips is no longer bothersome to me.  I realise now, in hindsight, that the reason it seemed too tiny for the Transformers review was that, well, TF can visually be an overcomplicated mess at any size.  The art direction on Osmosis Jones allowed for the image to shine through at any size.

Also, I’d like to personally bring up the use of CGI for Drix, furthering his othering in the story, but also his immediate artificial value.

I’m really glad you enjoyed it and that it provided food for thought, that’s exactly what I was hoping for. Aw yeah!

Also to your last point about Drix’s animation, you’re exactly right. On the commentary track for the DVD, Sito and Kroon note that each “species” has a particular design/animation language to further communicate what they are and how they relate to Frank. The cells have soft, squishy bodies with translucent exteriors because they are a part of Frank, they move along with him. The viruses have hard, solid, lizard-like forms further emphasizing how they don’t “fit” into the system (which is another little detail to layer into Thrax’s motivation). Similarly, Drix is an artificially created and foreign entity, so his body is solid, robotic looking, and animated using CGI. It’s a good example of using medium specific visuals to carry forward characterisation and themes I think.

Filed under osmosis jones double layer obfuscobble animation

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gentlenina replied to your post: Hey everyone! So, a close and much bel…

Omg so cute!

joyseeker56 replied to your post: Hey everyone! So, a close and much bel…

Cute icon!

obfuscobble replied to your post: Hey everyone! So, a close and much bel…

Gosh it looks cute and awesome! gemma did a great job!

Thank you all so much! Yes, Gemma is the best! I’m gonna try to get her to start a more robust artblog either here or back on devianart so she can get more love.

Filed under gentlenina joyseeker56 obfuscobble personal stuff

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obfuscobble replied to your post: anonymous asked:Did you ever read…

This series developed Sunstorm’s character… pretty much for the first time. Also got very close to continuing Starscream Skyfire shipping. heartbreakingly close.

renegadeautobotmischief replied to your post: anonymous asked:Did you ever read…

I actually highly recommend it (the War Within series, at least).

Hmmm… Maybe I’ll check both these out then.  Thank-you!

Filed under obfuscobble renegadeautobotmischief transformers transformers comics

25 notes

obfuscobble:

draqua:

Alright, big announcement time!

My time spent on tumblr and youtube these past 3 years observing the pop culture editorial scene has made me realize that I’ve got a serious passion for talking about kid’s cartoons. So, I’ve launched a new webseries called Double Layer aimed at offering reviews and editorial on children’s media and other entertainment related topics. Obviously, this project is just getting off the ground, so there’s likely going to be a steep learning curve and a lot of changes occurring video-to-video as I find a working flow. But, you’ll never learn until you start putting stuff out there.

For the first official episode of Double Layer, we examine the upcoming Transformers Age of Extinction and the Protagonist based on an expanded version of this post here.

REAL TALK Y’ALL

Draqua is starting a new series of video editorials, and they are not only entertaining but scholarly to the max.  She starts out strong by explaining the power of advertising and demographic shift in TF4, providing further reading and research for the audience alongside her expertly worded analysis and entertaining on-screen asides.  I recommend watching the video twice, or occasionally rewinding, to take in all of the information and fully internalise all the little details that might pass by too quick for your conscious mind… but your brain saw it.

I’m talking to Draqua now.  All the rest of y’all scurry off and watch the video and subscribe to her youtube. 

Okay Draqua, just a few concerns.  First, the video portion of this may be framed too small, since it wasn’t always easy to make out what was onscreen, though I understand the template may have you locked in there.  The choice of clip from Armada didn’t make the children immediately, erm, recognisable, though that’s Armada’s fault ; and I would’ve just shown Alexis and Starscream but that’s because of my bias so ignore that.  I sort of felt that the video was a bit short since it didn’t fully explore the power of demographic in the Transformers brand.  Although TF and Demographics is an entire video SERIES in itself so I guess it really couldn’t be covered here in any more detail than what was presented.  The relation between Hasbro, TF, and the boy-olderboy-man demographic switch is a very interesting and complex one, along with TF’s relation to its female fanbase.  As well, it would have been interesting to more thoroughly explore the current trend in media toward presenting father figures which you briefly brought up and provided examples for, since it speaks to both the change in the characters presented for the audience to identify with as well as an interesting revelation of new fears concerning manhood and the place of women.  Though that could be reserved for a future video, and I understand not delving too deeply.  Definitely begs for a followup vid after the movie comes out.  (please don’t think I’m criticising ; I’m just trying to give honest feedback and promote discussion)

On the positive side, I had honestly never thought about how juvenile Sam was as being intentional before, and that makes complete sense!  It was a revealing segment in the video and I am so so so thankful that you included it and spent time explaining it (including the notebook tidbit about the same juvenile behaviour from his parents being added due to the lack of a child’s ability to imagine being a parent) since it finally made sense with the film series’ ostensible attempts to remain appealing to a juvenile demographic!  Like, so much makes sense now.

And srs thank you for the links to more info.  It makes the series smarter.

When I saw the video was going to be about TF4, I expected a sort of TF brand/movie summary, and instead I got a brief but educated look at Advertising.  And frankly I like what I got much better than what I expected.  No brief “here’s what’s happening” review this, no!  Much greater things await us in Double Layer!  I am really really really looking forward to future videos!  This is so cool!

First off, let me just say thank-you very much for promoting my video like this and for the advice/comments. I want to make sure I’m constantly improving and making this series as fun, informative, and easily watchable as possible; concrit is always appreciated.

  • I absolutely agree that the tablet screen and notebook are too small. In future videos, I will adjust the background to make them larger

  • All of the talking points you mentioned (target demographic informing protagonists in Transformers media, daddy/daughter dynamics in contemporary fiction, Hasbro explicitly targeting older male fans/Hasbro’s treatment of female fans) are indeed all topics I’d love to cover more extensively in the future. So I’m really glad to know there’s an interest, this is the sort of thing I want to know

  • I’m hoping that future episodes will be longer as well: I’m thinking somewhere in the 10 - 15 minute range. Enough time to establish a thesis and discuss points/provide evidence, but not so long that the discussion becomes dreary or exhaustive

  • Finally, I’m glad that the external research and more theoretical concepts were well received and that you found them interesting. Again, these are all topics that could serve as their own episodes, but I want to keep Double Layer entertaining by grounding it in the applied examples of popular entertainment/children’s entertainment.

Once again, thank-you very much for all your words, and I’m really glad you enjoyed the first episode. Stay tuned for more hopefully sooner rather than later.

Filed under obfuscobble double layer

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draqua:

obfuscobble:

draqua:

Just a head’s up, some of the Rescue Bots cast & crew will be live-tweeting the first episode of season 2 as it airs tomorrow morning (12:30pm ET or 11:30am CT). The list includes Nicole Dubuc, DC Douglas, Parvesh Cheena, Steve Blum, and Diamond White. The hashtag’s gonna be #TFRescueBots.

Also, DC Douglas and Levar Burton have confirmed that they are recording S3 of Rescue Bots right now.

YESSSSSSSSS
I have no tweetable so I hope you’ll do the same thing you did last year and keep us all appraised?   Please?

I got your back bro

Sorry to do this do you, but the twitter party was such a rousing success that I just can’t screencap it all. Basically, every single Rescue Bots production member with a twitter account was jamming it up and the entire morning was solid gold. That being said, you don’t need a twitter account to search and read through hashtags, not to mention that being on twitter is one of the better ways to get into contact with voice actors/writers/animators/etc. Sorry again though

Still, the Rescue Bots S2 premiere was great and everyone who worked on it is a gem. Here’s looking forward to a great season!

Filed under rescue bots obfuscobble

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obfuscobble replied to your post: This has probably been brought up by o…

That is in fact a very notable problem which demands attention! (eee tachikoma spider buddies)

Every series, regardless of genre, network, or tone can be improved with the inclusion of Tachikoma.

Real talk though, Almost Human does seem to be trying to position the MX’s as the sort of “omni-present-reminder-that-this-is-a-sci-fi-setting mascot” the same way SIC used bouncy talking tanks. But the MX’s aren’t really meant to be charming, intriguing, or endearing. They’re at best comic relief, and totally off-putting at worst. I understand that this is the point (contrasting their inhumanity to Dorian’s) but still… It feels like we’re missing an angle here.

What made the Tachikoma interesting wasn’t just the fact that they were cutesy, but that they had a unique means of interacting with the world, with each other, and establishing a sense of self/identity. What they said and did was highly removed from anything a human being could conceivably experience; yet they were still likeable and fascinating to watch. So far, Dorian alone is bearing the “what does it mean to be human?” yoke and the MX’s are treated as simply pieces of disposable hardware. Please understand that this isn’t a detractor against Almost Human, merely an observation. Also, I understand that Almost Human isn’t really meant to be sci-fi show which asks ultra-serious questions, but rather a slick buddy-cop show with sci-fi elements, so okay.

Filed under obfuscobble almost human tachikoma ghost in the shell sac gits: sac