Draqua's pad

Media Junk

Posts tagged red letter media

7 notes

irongoldie asked: Why do you think Rich Evans is a hack fraud? Or is this some Red Letter Media in-joke i don't know about? (I only watch the Best of the Worst stuff).

irongoldie:

draqua:

Ah! The “Hack Fraud” thing is a RLM joke from the Mr. Plinkett stuff, mostly the updates and promo videos where he refers to Rich as a hack fraud and also on twitter from time to time.

I would never for real accuse to Rich as a fraud! I love Rich… But, not as much as Jay

Ah, okay.  Been a while since I’ve watched any of the Plinkett stuff, so I forgot all that.  To be honest, the only things of theirs I truly enjoy is the Plinkett stuff and Best of the Worst.  Plinkett, because it is the most well put together, the funniest, and actually does go in depth. Best of the Worst because I love bad movies.  I find Half in the Bag dull.  Honestly, they were funnier and more insightful to me when they did the Plinkett “gimmick” but I understand why they don’t do it anymore.

I understand. I love Half in the Bag though, even though I don’t always agree with their opinions on certain films, I always get interesting food for thought.

Plus the relationship between Mike and Jay is everything I value in my real life friends: drinking too much, being lazy, and complaining about the media and things.

Filed under red letter media

7 notes

irongoldie asked: Why do you think Rich Evans is a hack fraud? Or is this some Red Letter Media in-joke i don't know about? (I only watch the Best of the Worst stuff).

Ah! The “Hack Fraud” thing is a RLM joke from the Mr. Plinkett stuff, mostly the updates and promo videos where he refers to Rich as a hack fraud and also on twitter from time to time.

I would never for real accuse to Rich as a fraud! I love Rich… But, not as much as Jay

Filed under red letter media I would date Jay I would date Jay so hard Mike seems like the smartest but that's not always date worthy irongoldie

27 notes

Mike:
It's a ridiculous premise if you really think about it. It's stupid! But if it's so stupid, then you can't complain about how Splinter becomes a ninja master, cause it's so dumb!
Rich:
Alright, there's a cartoon going on right now, on Nickelodeon; it's a new Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon. And Splinter is a fully fleshed-out, thought-out, realized character that has emotions and a back-story.

Filed under red letter media tmnt 2012 tmnt 2014 critique Hack Fraud Rich Evans points out how bizarre characters do not have to lack depth and solid characterisation

107 notes

fuckyeah-redlettermedia:

Half In The Bag: The Transformers Series

Since a new one is coming out, Mike, Jay and Rich Evans sit down and check out the first three films in Michael Bay’s Transformers series. At the same time.

Are you hardcore enough to take the RLM challenge and watch all three live-action Transformers film at once simultaneously!?!

Filed under red letter media transformers fuckyeah-redlettermedia half in the bag michael bay for real though they make a good point about the predictability of these film and the repeated motifs/plot elements

8 notes

raeseddon:

draqua:

I’m probably preaching to the converted here, however given what came out in North America this weekend…

In the case of creating a multi-film/TV show/comic franchise, each work must still be able to stand on its own as a solid piece of entertainment fiction which tells a complete story with…

I think a huge part of the issue is that because it’s a franchise, the expectation is that the audience will devour any iteration of it out there, so they don’t expect someone to just watch the show or just watch the movies — they’re banking on the sort of blatant consumerism superhero franchises are made specifically for.  Conceptually, there’s nothing wrong with that, but in practice? Not so much.

Yeah, as the great Rich Evans once said, there’s an expectation that fans "care more about branding than they do about a good story". And it’s not necessarily individual consumers fault nor even producers’ fault, because we live in economic conditions that encourage it. But one certainly doesn’t have to like it.

Filed under raeseddon marvel red letter media

1 note

iam-artist asked: During the summer, I watched Star Trek Nemesis and remembered your comparison with Optimus Primal and Picard, in that their last appearances there was terrible handling of their characters. For Picard, the most blatant ooc I can think of was violating the the Prime Directive on that desert planet. In regardsto Picard's characterization, was it Shinzon's talk that he's what Picard could have become or is there something I'm missing?

In general, Star Trek: The Next Generation films don’t write or characterize Picard quite right. He comes off as more of an “take-no-prisoners, action hero” film lead type with a bloodlust at times rather than the calm, educated, forward thinking gentleman he was positioned as in the original series. Hence my comparison to Primal being changed from a down-to-earth (literally) general in Beast Wars, to a plant worshiping zealot in Beast Machines. I simply used the Star Trek Nemesis poster art back in this ask as an example since it’s the final TNG film (IE, the last piece of media we see Picard’s character in), though Star Trek: First Contact arguably writes Picard worse. But like all things, it’s debatable.

As for your question able the specifics of Picard’s OOC actions, I’m going to differ you to the Red Letter Media Star Trek: Nemesis review on the subject since they’re basically my points exactly. Content warning for the video though due to some very coarse language and dark humor.

As always, everything on my blog from the original post you referenced to the answer I write here is nothing more than my personal opinion. Thank you for the ask.

Filed under iam-artist beast machines red letter media star trek nemesis star trek tng picard

30 notes

Stuff I’ve been listening to…

Truly, the zenith of internet communication has been to connect me to other people who will make 20+ minute videos endlessly nitpicking aspects of popular video-games, movies, and children’s television cartoons. Here are some of the video-reviewers or audio editorial people I’ve been enjoying recently and why.

1. Folding Ideas: Probably one of the most underrated members of Chez Apocalypse, the show (by way of a bespectacled cardboard puppet) discusses what makes for good (and bad) popular cinema, most often by tackling the screen-play or story structure. 

2. Mr.Btongue (aka Bobby the Tongue): Made semi-famous for his series on the Mass Effect 3 ending, conducts extensive, and highly satirical, reviews on thematic/technical/writing aspects of video-games more in a sense of their genre.

3. Errant Signal: Does highly detailed video-game reviews, but typically on individual, contemporary titles. Tends to skew more towards the serious end of editorial discussion, focusing less on the mechanical aspects of the game and more on story, character portrayal, sexism, and how (if at all) gameplay compliments a game’s statement.

4. SF Debris: This one’s been around for awhile, but I never really checked him out until I saw he’d been doing a full series review on Magical Girl Madoka. SFD’s main focus is conducting “opinionated” reviews of Star Trek and other televised science fiction shows, but also covers a wide range of movies, cartoons, and some anime.

5. Red Letter Media: Lots folks love Mr. Plinkett reviews, but I’ve found their Half in the Bag segments to be even more fun, and meatier food-for-thought on good storytelling. Best of Worst has been growing on me too.

6. Black Nerd Comedy: Regularly updated (as in multiple times a week!) video reviews of cartoons, comics, franchise updates, toy news, etc. All from the perspective of the infectiously energetic Andre “The Black Nerd”.

7. Needs More Gay: A sometimes sobering, sometimes hilarious, sometimes sparkly look into queer representation in both popular and longtail fandoms.

8. YMS (YourMovieSucks): Fast-paced, monotone reviews of popular movies that seeks to answer the most important question of bad movies: why does it suck?

I’m always up for recommendations, so feel free to shoot me some fresh talent via my ask box or in a reblog.

Filed under video games folding ideas mr. btongue errant signal SF debris red letter media needs more gay black nerd comedy yms reviews media anlysis shoot me some girl reviewers or video editorial peeps I need more of those

47 notes

I’m sorry that there are no more roles in Hollywood for women who are over 40…

They play witches!

You got Julia Roberts, who was the evil queen in Mirror Mirror. Charlize Theron was also in a Snow White thing, Snow White and the Huntsman.

Angelina Jolie is going to play the evil queen in the Sleeping Beauty reboot.

So watch out Kristen Stewart and Anne Hathaway… And all you young ladies!

You’re all gonna end up witches…

Mike Stoklasa & Jay Bauman, Half in the Bag 48 “Hansel and Gretel/Jack the Giant Slayer"

Remember, they’re talking about Hollywood… not Madoka

image

Contract?

(Source: redlettermedia.com)

Filed under red letter media half in the bag madoka magical girl madoka puella magi madoka magica mike stoklasa jay bauman kyubei qb

2 notes

image konthelion reblogged your photoset: No matter what happens in the world of cartoons, I…

lot of things at once, but it messed up really badly as a result. I tried to watch all of

When the story starts to get going, the show starts to suck.

Like someone pulling a thread on a sweater, until the sweater starts to suck.

image

…  And the sweater also contains cats.

Filed under konthelion thundercats 2011 thundercats mr plinkett red letter media plinkett indiana jones and the kingdom of the crystal skull

61 notes

*made re-bloggable by request*

This is a very interesting question.

Indeed, you’re right.  We live in a media landscape where nearly all of the big name children’s cartoons, movies, video-games, and some TV shows are based off of pre-existing franchises/remakes.  As usual, it has a lot to do with money and the logic that audiences will keep coming back to a brand which has entertained them well in the past…  but there’s something a little more complex going on here I think.

Because, we also live in a world where there are a huge amount of screens (TV, laptop, tablet, cellphone, video games on your TV, handheld games, movie theaters, internet) competing for our attention.  It’s very easy for audiences to find a large amount of entertainment, what’s not so easy is for media-makers to find a large audience. 

To illustrate what I mean, consider these two examples: Chris Anderson’s theory of The Long Tail, and Red Letter Media's Blurring Effect of Popular Culture as discussed in Mr. Plinkett’s review of the 2009 Star Trek film (skip to 6:46 of part 1).  While one is academic and the other is satirical; both hit very similar central themes when it comes to audiences and the media products they partake in.

The Long Tail holds that culture and the economy is shifting away from focusing on a small number of “hits” (mainstream products and markets that everyone buys into), and towards a huge number of niche titles that only a few people are interested in.  Niche titles tend to be cheaper and faster to produce, but are also ultra specific.  Furthermore, in a world where products, media, and services are increasingly accessed through non-physical means, niche products can be made easily accessible to customers via the internet.  Producers can no longer bank on people being interested in buying/watching one product, because they can turn to other, highly personalized forms of entertainment through other mediums.

The Red Letter Media crew poses a similar paradox; there’s an abundance of TV channels, movies, TV shows, popular websites, etc. available right now.  People don’t have to all watch the same things anymore, and people are more likely to gravitate to what interests them and only that.  So, in order to guarantee a strong viewership, media makers focus on recognizable names, brands, and franchises from pre-mass internet culture; because the farther back you go, the less competition there is, and the sharper the image will be.

This is a particularly big deal for children’s entertainment media, because its a genre so heavily based in easily recognizable images, concepts, and characters.  This has a lot to do with tie-in products.  Remember, most televised animation (particularly the heavy hitters like Transformers and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles) make their money almost exclusively through merchandise: toys, stuffies, books, clothes, theme parks, fruit pies, underwear, etc.

Audience interest, and finance, is easily distracted and attention/money moves quickly to and from things.  I think cartoons, much like video-games, are becoming somewhat like the movie industry.  They get media exposure, conduct events, generate buzz, and generally do everything humanly possible with all the multi-media tools at their disposal to ensure people are watching their show.   This is particularly notable in the case of shows like Transformers Prime and My Little Pony who get a ton of promotional attention on the HUB network, since they’re the big rating draw, and also represent two of Hasbro’s most visible brands right now.

This gets back to your original point that so many popular kid’s TV shows these days are franchise related: its because they represent a safer bet for media companies to sink their dollars into.  The name offers a measure of security that people will engage with that specific show as opposed to doing something else.  Big, franchise names attract the most money, big names, and big talent.  Meanwhile, original content shows don’t always get the best treatment.

Now, like you said, just because something is a remake or part of a franchise (not original content): doesn’t automatically make it bad.  And by extension, just because something is original, doesn’t make it automatically good.  It’s okay not to get into Motorcity, heck, I have some problems with it too; although I love it for its animation, designs, and the female characters.  Now, it can be debated if Disney’s to blame when it comes to Motorcity’s narrative problems, and we’re still not sure just how much creative control The Mouse House had over what actually got in the show (or what they took out). 

I do think there’s a concern to be raised that the big name franchise titles, like TFP or Ultimate Spider-man, might draw money/talent/resources away from original titles

Would Motorcity be better if it had Charlie Bean (director of Tron: Uprising) on board?  If Marty Isenberg (story editor of Transformers Animated and GI Joe Renegades) headed up the writing staff of Motorcity, would plot and character development flow better?  If it commanded the kind of external media attention Transformers Prime does, would Disney treat its scheduling better? 

The 2012 TMNT was given the green light for a second, 26 episode season after only the first 2 episodes had premiered whereas Motorcity’s was not renewed.  If Motorcity was…  say…  a cartoon tie-in for Hot Wheels or something…  would fate have been kinder?  Would the production staff have been allowed more creative freedom?

I think its important to know that franchise association does not automatically imply safety…  Tron Uprising's in danger too, and GI Joe Renegades was canceled to make room in public consciousness for the second live-action GI Joe movie.  Entertainment is a fickle mistress.

Anyways, this has probably gone on for too long.  But to cap it all off:

  • Franchises are both a cause and a result of the current economic, entertainment media, and culture environment we find ourselves in 
  • A good show, regardless of origins, will always be a good show.  Don’t feel ashamed for loving a merchandise-driven money sink.  Don’t feel disappointed in yourself for not liking something with original content 
  • Life isn’t fair: good show’s get cancelled through no fault of their own. Franchise or not
  • It’s all about the money money money
  • My inbox is always open for further inquiries

Thank you for reading

Filed under motorcity tfp tmnt red letter media media analysis children's cartoons spider-man tron tron uprising mr. plinkett transformers to sell toys

5 notes

Anonymous asked: In this period of animation, or just the entertainment industry in general, so many cartoons nowadays are based off of old franchises. That's not to say those certain revamps have been bad; most are actually pretty good. I bring this up because a friend lamented that cartoons these days are too dependent on franchises; nothing is original anymore. Any original I do find, its usually low quality to me (can't get into Motorcity at all). Your thoughts?

This is a very interesting question.

Indeed, you’re right.  We live in a media landscape where nearly all of the big name children’s cartoons, movies, video-games, and some TV shows are based off of pre-existing franchises/remakes.  As usual, it has a lot to do with money and the logic that audiences will keep coming back to a brand which has entertained them well in the past…  but there’s something a little more complex going on here I think.

Because, we also live in a world where there are a huge amount of screens (TV, laptop, tablet, cellphone, video games on your TV, handheld games, movie theaters, internet) competing for our attention.  It’s very easy for audiences to find a large amount of entertainment, what’s not so easy is for media-makers to find a large audience. 

To illustrate what I mean, consider these two examples: Chris Anderson’s theory of The Long Tail, and Red Letter Media's Blurring Effect of Popular Culture as discussed in Mr. Plinkett’s review of the 2009 Star Trek film (skip to 6:46 of part 1).  While one is academic and the other is satirical; both hit very similar central themes when it comes to audiences and the media products they partake in.

The Long Tail holds that culture and the economy is shifting away from focusing on a small number of “hits” (mainstream products and markets that everyone buys into), and towards a huge number of niche titles that only a few people are interested in.  Niche titles tend to be cheaper and faster to produce, but are also ultra specific.  Furthermore, in a world where products, media, and services are increasingly accessed through non-physical means, niche products can be made easily accessible to customers via the internet.  Producers can no longer bank on people being interested in buying/watching one product, because they can turn to other, highly personalized forms of entertainment through other mediums.

The Red Letter Media crew poses a similar paradox; there’s an abundance of TV channels, movies, TV shows, popular websites, etc. available right now.  People don’t have to all watch the same things anymore, and people are more likely to gravitate to what interests them and only that.  So, in order to guarantee a strong viewership, media makers focus on recognizable names, brands, and franchises from pre-mass internet culture; because the farther back you go, the less competition there is, and the sharper the image will be.

This is a particularly big deal for children’s entertainment media, because its a genre so heavily based in easily recognizable images, concepts, and characters.  This has a lot to do with tie-in products.  Remember, most televised animation (particularly the heavy hitters like Transformers and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles) make their money almost exclusively through merchandise: toys, stuffies, books, clothes, theme parks, fruit pies, underwear, etc.

Audience interest, and finance, is easily distracted and attention/money moves quickly to and from things.  I think cartoons, much like video-games, are becoming somewhat like the movie industry.  They get media exposure, conduct events, generate buzz, and generally do everything humanly possible with all the multi-media tools at their disposal to ensure people are watching their show.   This is particularly notable in the case of shows like Transformers Prime and My Little Pony who get a ton of promotional attention on the HUB network, since they’re the big rating draw, and also represent two of Hasbro’s most visible brands right now.

This gets back to your original point that so many popular kid’s TV shows these days are franchise related: its because they represent a safer bet for media companies to sink their dollars into.  The name offers a measure of security that people will engage with that specific show as opposed to doing something else.  Big, franchise names attract the most money, big names, and big talent.  Meanwhile, original content shows don’t always get the best treatment.

Now, like you said, just because something is a remake or part of a franchise (not original content): doesn’t automatically make it bad.  And by extension, just because something is original, doesn’t make it automatically good.  It’s okay not to get into Motorcity, heck, I have some problems with it too; although I love it for its animation, designs, and the female characters.  Now, it can be debated if Disney’s to blame when it comes to Motorcity’s narrative problems, and we’re still not sure just how much creative control The Mouse House had over what actually got in the show (or what they took out). 

I do think there’s a concern to be raised that the big name franchise titles, like TFP or Ultimate Spider-man, might draw money/talent/resources away from original titles

Would Motorcity be better if it had Charlie Bean (director of Tron: Uprising) on board?  If Marty Isenberg (story editor of Transformers Animated and GI Joe Renegades) headed up the writing staff of Motorcity, would plot and character development flow better?  If it commanded the kind of external media attention Transformers Prime does, would Disney treat its scheduling better? 

The 2012 TMNT was given the green light for a second, 26 episode season after only the first 2 episodes had premiered whereas Motorcity’s was not renewed.  If Motorcity was…  say…  a cartoon tie-in for Hot Wheels or something…  would fate have been kinder?  Would the production staff have been allowed more creative freedom?

I think its important to know that franchise association does not automatically imply safety…  Tron Uprising's in danger too, and GI Joe Renegades was canceled to make room in public consciousness for the second live-action GI Joe movie.  Entertainment is a fickle mistress.

Anyways, this has probably gone on for too long.  But to cap it all off:

  • Franchises are both a cause and a result of the current economic, entertainment media, and culture environment we find ourselves in 
  • A good show, regardless of origins, will always be a good show.  Don’t feel ashamed for loving a merchandise-driven money sink.  Don’t feel disappointed in yourself for not liking something with original content 
  • Life isn’t fair: good show’s get cancelled through no fault of their own. Franchise or not
  • It’s all about the money money money
  • My inbox is always open for further inquiries

Thank you for reading

Filed under motorcity red letter media tfp tmnt media analysis the long tail mr. plinkett pop culture spider-man franchise remakes mlp buy the toys disney

9 notes

busterella reblogged your link: Multi-Year Agreement Grants Shout! Factory Rights to “Beetlejuice” Animated Series

…I’m kinda stunned by the sudden realization that toon!BJ was basically a Manic Pixie Dream Boy? Because oh my god he….

That’s a pretty good way to sum it up. 

Lydia lives a stable, but fairly dull existence in her small town with her loving but out-of-touch parents.  Beetlejuice represents everything lacking from her everyday life; adventure, indulgence in creepy/supernatural, and excitement.  She can call up Beetlejuice whenever she wants, and leave whenever she wants.  Best of all, BJ never really asks for anything in return, so long as Lydia is happy.  As you said: it’s no wonder young girls found this premise so appealing, and why they continue to remember the show fondly to this day. 

When you look back at nostalgic media with adult eyes, you start uncovering the subtle elements that attracted or repelled audiences.

Filed under busterella beetlejuice tmnt red letter media mr plinkett lydia shout factory you might not have noticed it but your brain did